CBC Children Happiest in Kenya- Primary School Chair

Speaking on Tuesday, September 14, Nzioka dismissed the fears parents have with the mountainous workload the pupils have in the curriculum, noting that the learners have the highest happiness index in Kenya.

CBC Children Happiest in Kenya- Primary School Chair

Kenya Primary School Headteachers Association (KEPSHA) chair, Johnson Nzioka, has affirmed that children learning under the contentious Competency-Based Curriculum are the happiest in the whole country.

Speaking on Tuesday, September 14, Nzioka dismissed the fears parents have with the mountainous workload the pupils have in the curriculum, noting that the learners have the highest happiness index in Kenya.

Nzioka termed the curriculum as a friendlier one compared to the previous one which was loaded with assignments and exams.

Kenya Primary School Headteachers Association (KEPSHA) chair, Johnson Nzioka. /FILE

He also addressed concerns that teachers were ill-trained to handle the demands of the new 2-6-6-3 curriculum which was touted as a game-changer in the country's education.

The KEPHSA chair ruled that the system had involved teachers in terms of its development, thus they know what to expect in the curriculum as well as the content in the books the learners are using.

"Kenyan learners have the highest happiness index, thanks to Competency-Based Curriculum (CBC). They are not stressed by exams, and the assessment given is friendlier," stated Nzioka.

His sentiments follow Education CS George Magoha's affirmation that the CBC education system would not be changed, opining that the government was financing its learners in order to receive the best education.

The CS declared that the CBC is here to stay and discouraged parents from moving to court to stop the new system, a feat that has so far only been managed by Law Society of Kenya president Nelson Havi.

"Nothing is perfect. CBC is not perfect. But it left the station in 2018 and is moving forward," the Education CS stated.

Havi announced on Wednesday, September 8 that he would file a petition on the new Competency-Based Curriculum (CBC) in court the following week while ruling that the education system in Kenya should not be costly and an ineffective experiment meted on school-going children.

"The education system in Kenya should not be an expensive, inefficient and ineffective experiment with our children and their future as is our leadership," he wrote.

Since then, the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD) has been urging for calm after many complaints were raised among parents over the curriculum.

The National Assembly Education Committee consequentially on Friday, September 10, summoned KICD to address some of the burning issues affecting the implementation of the new curriculum

The Busia County Woman Representative Florence Mutua-led committee wants KICD to come clean on some of the problematic issues, threatening the future of CBC, especially the more tedious homework.

KICD offices in Nairobi. /CAPITAL GROUP