CS Yatani To Take Two Bloggers To Court

He took to social media on Sunday, September 26 to deny their reports that had alleged that his son was nabbed at the airport on Friday, September 24 ferrying mounds of foreign currency. 

CS Yatani To Take Two Bloggers To Court

Treasury Cabinet Secretary Ukur Yatani has vowed legal action against controversial bloggers Robert Alai and Cyprian Nyakundi after they published information regarding his son's arrest at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA).

He took to social media on Sunday, September 26 to deny their reports that had alleged that his son was nabbed at the airport on Friday, September 24 ferrying mounds of foreign currency. 

Yatani said that the reports spread by the two bloggers were false and unfounded. 

Entrance to the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi. /FILE

"The social media reports by Alai and Nyakundi that one of my sons was arrested at the airport is false, malicious & utter nonsense,” Yatani stated. 

Nyakundi had published allegations that Yatani's son was placed in custody after attempting to sneak undeclared foreign currency out of Kenya. 

The CS stated that the allegations led to the damage of his reputation and that of his family, stating that the bloggers were out to gain from their publications. 

“It’s sad to note the extent heartless individuals can go to besmirch innocent family’s reputation to achieve an end,” read the statement  

Yatani concluded that he would seek legal redress against the two bloggers. 

Nyakundi was recently part of a ruling that led to a big win for journalists and Kenyans in general. The High Court in Nairobi declared section 66 of the penal code as outdated and in violation of the Constitution of Kenya.

In a statement, Justice Weldon Korir had ruled that section 66 of the penal code was retrogressive. 

The code indicates that 'any person who publishes any false statement, rumour or report which is likely to cause fear and alarm to the public or to disturb the public peace is guilty of a misdemeanor.' 

In his ruling, Korir observed that the ruling tampered with people's freedom of expression and made it difficult for them to express themselves properly as long as the code was in action. 

Blogger Cyprian Nyakundi. /FILE